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Best Foods for Fatty Liver & 11 Foods to avoid with Fatty Liver

Changing your eating habits and starting a proper diet is the most crucial part of fatty liver treatment. We need to cut your body fat! It’s all about eating the correct foods for fatty liver.

There is a famous saying: “You are what you eat”.

I could not describe better in what this article is all about. The food you eat and the drinks you drink are the building blocks of your body. Your overall health (and your liver’s health specifically), is very much depend on the things you eat and don’t eat.

The fact is that people are so used to what they eat and drink, it’s very hard to change their eating habits just because it’s “healthier”.

But if one has a good reason, like diseases that depend on what you eat, it gives a lot of motivation to make hard changes.

And this is EXACTLY what we have here. Let me remind you that a fatty liver is a disease can be progress into chronic liver diseases, so leaving it untreated is NOT an option for you. Start controlling yourself and take this matter seriously.

Foods for Fatty LiverFoods for Fatty Liver

In the following sections we’re going to talk about the different food groups, their effect on your liver’s health and what should you do to avoid any to damage to your liver.

It’s super-important to follow my guidance exactly as written. That’s the only way I can guarantee you a success.

The big picture here is to cut fat and sugar intakes, and replace it with healthy foods with dietary fiber and proteins, whole grains products, and low-fat dairy and meet.

I highly suggest printing and sticking them on your refrigerator.

Foods to Eat with Fatty Liver

Focus on products with high dietary fiber, proteins, and whole wheat grains. And don’t forget about foods and vegetables, as they are extremely important in your diet.

For most connivance, each food type is separated into its own row. Here are the complete list of the best foods to eat with fatty liver:

Food type Instructions
Fat group First and foremost, you should empty your daily diets of food with high levels of fat. Various types of Oils must be used sparingly. Your aim should be to eat foods around 5% fat or below. Avoid anything above 10% fat. If it’s too high, just don’t eat it. Trust me – it’s not worth it.

Make sure to avoid any food with high saturated fat content. Favor those with unsaturated fat, and at lower amounts at that.

Beverages Alcoholic beverages should be avoided. If you’re not a fan of alcohol, I recommend you to completely avoid it. But if you do like alcohol, you are allowed to drink “here and there”.

Other beverages such as soft drinks, energy drinks and processed fruit juices should be bought with great care. I recommend completely avoid carbonated soft drinks such as Coca-Cola. Again, check the nutritional labels again to make sure that there is no high sugar and sodium content.

Meats Generally speaking, meat is a very good source of protein, which is an essential part in the body’s metabolic and cellular processes. However, as a fatty liver patient take case of the meat of eat.

When buying meat, make sure you exclude the skin and fat layers of the meat. As for pre-cooked and canned foods, check the label for the fat level.

You may eat sea food, beans and lean meat. Just be sure to scrape away cooked and raw fat from the meat. Fried meats are alright as long as only a very small amount of oil is used. To be on the safer side, eat only the dishes that are steamed or boiled, instead of deep-fried. Meats are also a good source of Vitamin B.

Meat & Poultry Eggs and chicken meat are also a good source of protein. However, along with dairy products, they are also sources of fat. Dark meat (pork and beef) has higher fat content than white meat (chicken, fish and turkey). These protein sources must be taken sparingly as well.

Remove the skin part when eating chicken because it is a rich source of cholesterol.

 Dairy There are dairy products that are available in fat-free and reduced-fat varieties. If consuming them is unavoidable, check the labels of the different products and choose the ones with the least amount of fat in each serving. Mayonnaise and salad dressings fall under this group.

While salads in itself are alright to eat, the dressings may not be. In the same way as the other dairy products, use mayonnaise with the least fat content.

Vegetables Greens and leaves should always be part of you daily diet, and they are needed more than ever for fatty liver patients. Green vegetables contain folic acid which, as mentioned in the previous chapter, is essential for liver health. Salads should be fresh, and try to eat only those that have very small amounts of dressing.

Beets, Carrots & Tomatoes are some of the best examples of vegetables rich with Glutathione, a protein that protects the liver. Eating these will can help stimulate and improve overall liver function.

Fruits Citrus fruits in particular contain essential vitamins that will help keep the body healthy.

Vitamin C and Folic acid are two of the most useful vitamins that fruits contain. Vitamin C is starting to have a great potential as a fatty liver treatment.

Carbohydrate group Carbohydrates should still be part of your diet. Good sources of carbohydrates are whole grains, brown rice, wheat bread and pasta. They contain complex carbohydrates, which is recommended to join the bulk of a fatty liver patient’s diet.

Simple carbohydrates like the ones in candy stick to the teeth (the primary cause of tooth decay in children) and are stored in the adipose tissues.

Focus on low-fat foods, foods with high in Protein, Vegetables, whole-wheat grains, beans and foods with high fiber.

A Food Pyramid to Follow

Take a close look at the following food pyramid to get an idea on the recommended foods for fatty liver:

Food Pyramid - Fatty Liver

Foods to Avoid with Fatty Liver

After going through all food groups, let’s go into specifics on the foods bad for the liver. These foods are mostly high on fat, cholesterol, and sugar (including artificial sweeteners).

You won’t be able to avoid them completely, and I’m not going to ask you to do so. But it must be controlled – and that’s what we’re going to do.

When you’re in a supermarket, look for the ingredients of every product you want to buy. If it’s high on fat or sugar, take only 1 or 2 units of these in whole shopping basket.

By avoid or drastically reducing unhealthy foods intake, you will make your liver’s life a lot easier and it will take the time to repair itself.

Name Properties Instructions
White bread
  • High in Carbs.
  • Spikes blood sugar.
  • Spikes insulin levels.
Replace with whole wheat bread. Make sure it has a “100% Whole Grain” stamp.
Butter
  • Extremely high on fat (81%).
  • OK to eat once in a while in its natural form.
  • Completely avoid foods that made from high amounts of butter, like cakes and Boreks.
Sugar-high Breakfast Cereals
  • High in sugar and artificial sweeteners.
  • Some high in fat.
  • Contains flavorings, preservatives, and unnatural colors.
Opt for cereals with 100% whole grains and select a cereal fortified with added vitamins and minerals and rich in fiber.
Fast foods: Hamburger, Pizza, French fries.
  • High on fatty oil.
  • High on cholesterol.
  • Extremely fattening.
Limit 2 slices of pizza per 2 weeks, and 1 hamburger per 3 weeks.
Carbonated drinks
  • High on sugar and/or artificial sweeteners..
Replace with calorie-free carbonated water or soda.
Red meat, such as beef and bison
  • Very high on fat.
  • Very high on cholesterol.
  • Hard to digest.
Avoid high fat steaks.
Bacon
  • High on sodium.
  • Increases blood pressure.
  • Increases chance of diabetes.
OK to eat few rashers per week.
High fat cheese
  • High on fat.
  • High on cholesterol.
Replace with reduced fat (5%-9%) cheese like Feta, Ricotta, Siren, etc.
Canned foods: Soups, meats or vegetables
  • Usually contain lots of salt, which is hard to process by a damaged liver.
Use garlic, pepper or spices to flavor foods instead of salt.
Chocolate, cakes, cookies, candies, and other sweets
  • High in sugar
  • Usually has artificial sweeteners, flavorings, preservatives, and unnatural colors.
  • Addictive.
Replace all sweats with dark chocolate, and limit yourself to 4 cubes per week.
Alcohol
  • High in calories.
  • The liver works hard to break down alcohol, and if consumed excessively, it could lead to liver damage.
  • Limit of completely avoid any type of alcohol.
  • If you must, drink low-alcohol beverages, such as Red Wine, up to one glass per week.
Eggs
  • Extremely high in Cholesterol.
  • Moderate amount of fat (10%).
  • High in Protein. 

 

  • No need to avoid – just limit yourself to 2 x eggs per week.
  • If you like omelets include 1 whole egg, and 2 more eggs with only the “white” part

Other Ingredients and foods to avoid with fatty liver

I’ve also created a printer-friendly document that has many types of foods and ingredients to avoid with fatty liver that aren’t or only partially mentioned in the above list You are welcome to download it for free, just click the download button below:

Pay a special attention to the ingredients listed in the document. I recommend to print and keep it with you every time you go to a store to buy food. Double check the ingredients of everything before you put it in your cart. If the ingredient is mentioned in the document you’ve just downloaded – don’t buy it unless you have to.

Moderation is the key

I hope I covered everything you needed to know about foods for fatty liver. It’s a drastic change in your eating habits, but not impossible. The key is to understand why these foods are bad for your liver, and with that thought on your mind, limit yourself on how often you eat your favorite delicious foods.

Determination and a proper control on what’s gets into your body through your mouth is the key to defeat the disease.

The aftermath of all of this is that this will also make you to lose weight, which is the #1 goal for anyone with fatty liver.

Need any help?

It’s hard to change your eating habits as you’re used to the foods you eat your whole life. If a need a good guidance to help you with it, I recommend using the fatty liver diet guide written by Dorothy Spencer BSN, RN. It helped hundreds of my patients. Click here to learn more.

Fatty Liver is now the #1 cause of Chronic Liver Diseases

The Liver Meeting® (AASLD) 2014 has now switched the main focus on liver diseases on Fatty Liver. The main reason is that a cure for Hepatitis C is now a reality, thus making fatty liver as the most emerging cause of chronic liver diseases.

I’ve been saying for more than a decade that Fatty Liver is probably become the most alerting liver disease ever. Good to know that it’s now been confirmed and everyone take it seriously.

Some insights on what should be done

2014’s The Liver Meeting offered a detailed explanation into the mechanism, diagnosis, and treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and the more advanced form of the disease – nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH).

They concluded that the current situation in America and probably in the rest of the world is that no one really knows how every medical institute diagnose fatty liver and whether they do it properly. And this needs to be improved.

How they concluded that?

They asked a 23-question survey on academic gastroenterologists and hepatologists in the USA, with questions related to the current diagnostic patterns for fatty liver.

They saw that liver biopsy remains the main way to establish a 100% accurate diagnosis. However, biopsy has been answered by roughly 25% of the respondents. More than 50% said they rely elevated liver enzyme in the blood and abdominal ultrasound.

Conclusion

The main conclusion is that there needs be a global understanding on how to properly diagnose a fatty liver. Only than we could increase the rate people are diagnosed with fatty liver before it’s too late.

This is because diagnosing fatty liver is with no doubt the most important step on treating it.

My suggestion? The World Health organization should write and post a clear guild-line on the internet, on how to properly diagnose a Fatty liver. This way everything will do the same

The truth about Mild Fatty infiltration of the Liver

I see a lot of places recently talking about Mild Fatty Infiltration of the Liver, and it troubles me to find that many people think that is not really a condition that should be taken seriously.

The meaning of mild fatty infiltration of the liver is the fact that fatty liver isn’t yet developed at its full scale. Blood results would show some levels of elevated liver enzymes, but not as much.

Liver ultrasound would show some levels of enlarged liver and fat around the liver, but again, not as much as a non-mild fatty infiltration of the liver.

The truth about Mild Fatty Infiltration of the Liver

The problem is, there is actually no such thing. To avoid fatty liver complications, the disease needs an attention as soon as you are diagnosed, no matter if it’s mild or at any other stage.

If you are being told you “only” have a mild fatty liver infiltration and it’s nothing to worry about – don’t take it for granted. Your aim should be to stop the disease as soon as possible by treating fatty liver. Don’t wait for the advancement of the disease.

If you have been told you have a Mild Fatty Infiltration of the Liver, comment below and tell your story.

Liver Enzymes and Exercise

In recent years, there are many indications that liver enzymes levels in the blood and exercise have some kind of association.

For example, taking a blood test close to the time you exercised, could result elevated levels of liver enzymes in the results.

The act of exercising has an affect on the level of liver enzymes, and when taking a blood test timed closely with the exercise, it could result with misleading outcome.

The physician will probably think the blood test results is because of viral infection, which is not true.

However, there is an easy workaround to this situation.

Before taking any blood test, make sure you haven’t exercised beforehand.

It will prevent any unnecessary conclusions regarding your conditions.

It is recommended to wait for about 3 hours after the initial exercise before going through a blood test; this will prevent any mistakes in the blood test related to liver enzymes and exercise.

24 years old Fatty Liver patient

This is a letter I received not a long time ago from David, a 24 years old man, who was diagnosed to have a fatty liver:

Quote:

2 Months ago I was told I have Fatty Liver Disease. I am 24 years old, I weight at 260 pounds, 5’11” tall. I am over weight and I have more fatty mass than muscle mass. Knowing that I have this disease is draining my mind and creating a lot of stress because I just don’t know how bad I have it.

What makes it more stressful is the fact that I have lost 17 pounds since January of this year and I don’t know how I did it. I read that weight loss is a sign of advancement of the Disease. The only thing I have changed is that I have been eating a healthy breakfast in the morning that includes lots of fruit and no exercise. The other thing that I had done was take synthroid for my thyroid functions. I took the pill for 3 months or so and stopped taking it around January. I am stilling losing weight to this day and it is driving me nuts.

Can you tell me at my age should I be worried about the weight loss as a sign of advancement? I just pray that its not that far along so that I can have a chance to exercise and eat better to turn this disease around. What can I do to see just how bad I really have it. Your prompt response would be greatly enjoyed.

Few hours later I sent him the following answer:

Before I can answer to your questions, I need to know some missing details.

First of all, which type of fatty liver disease do you have? Alcoholic or nonalcoholic fatty liver disease?
Have you performed any abdominal ultrasound test for fatty liver diagnosis?

Second, have you done any liver function blood tests? If so, what were the results? Specifically, the results of liver enzymes ALT and AST.

You are 24 years old; meaning the change the disease isn’t advanced yet. It takes decades for a fatty liver to advance to a much serious liver conditions.

Waiting for your reply.
Dr. Mark Bar-Gomel

David replied:

I have NAFLD. A ultrasound was preformed on my liver to determine that I have NAFLD. My blood test results were: AST = 82, ALT= 161. Tests were done 12/16/08.

My report produced from the ultrasound is as follows:

FINDINGS: The liver is difficult to penetrate and has a coarsened echotexture.
No hepatic mass or intrahepatic biliary ductal dilatation is seen. The
pancreas appears normal. The gallbladder is normal. Right kidney is normal.
Common bile duct measures 3 mm. No free fluid is seen.

IMPRESSION: The appearance of the liver suggests hepatic steatosis. No focal
hepatic lesion or intrahepatic biliary ductal dilatation is seen.

I hope you can answer my questions with the information given above. With that said, In general what can I eat to help my liver out? I heard lemon juice is okay? Is this true? What else if you have any other ideas.

My answer to him:

From the information you provided, it is my honest though that your condition is reversible. I’m positive your weight loose is not an indication for advanced stage of the disease.
To reverse the condition, it will require from you to change your life style and eating habits.

Regarding lemon juice, the answer is yes. There are some indications that lemon juice is good for a fatty liver. You can also read the foods for fatty liver article that gives a good guideline for what you should eat.