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Fatty Liver Supplements – the 4 natural supplements that work!

Why Supplements Matter

Natural supplements are an important part on fatty liver treatment. It’s been proved over and over that they aid and help on treating the disease. Do not confuse natural supplements with traditional drugs. These are natural sources of compounds found in nature that help our liver to recover and do its job better. It’s as simple as it sounds.

So if you’re serious on getting better and want to be fatty liver free, you must include fatty liver supplements into your daily routine as well as a proper diet and exercise.

The Supplements

I will be honest – there are lots of supplements that claim to improve liver’s health. Very few of them are useful, but most of them have a little effect, if any.

The secret is to combine the supplements. I have researched years after years which are the most effective natural fatty liver supplements to help treating fatty liver. Most of my research was on over 300 of my own fatty liver patients.

And what I’ve found is remarkable.
Fatty Liver Supplements

The Best Natural Fatty Liver Supplements

Here is the plain list of the best combination of supplements to help treating fatty liver. Remember, it’s only effective when combined together.

Supplement name Effects/ Explanation Amount per serving
Natural Iron
  • Most of fatty liver patients have some degree of Iron deficiency.
  • 29 mg
  • Take one capsule per day with food and water.
Vitamin C
  • Vitamin C is necessary for proper Iron absorption.
  • Fundamental free radical protection for overall wellness.
  • 1,000 mg
  • One capsule per day with food and water.
Turmeric
  • Natural tonic for the liver and gastrointestinal system.
  • Features a high concentration of powerful antioxidant Curcuminoids.
  • Free radical protection for digestive system health.
  • 720 mg
  • Once per day with water.
Milk Thistle
  • A powerful liver protector.
  • Used as a liver tonic in Europe for centuries.
  • 250 mg
  • One capsule two to three times per day with water.

Remember I mentioned I found something remarkable?

What’s remarkable in my finding is that if a fatty liver patient takes Milk Thistle alone – it probably won’t change a thing. Same thing with Turmeric – it has no effect then taking alone.

But if one takes both Turmeric AND Milk Thistle together – it does wonders!

One fatty liver supplement complements the other.

Same thing with Iron – it must be taken together with Vitamin C for a proper absorption.

Try the supplements for at least one whole year and I assure you – you will see amazing results. Your liver will be much healthier and it will clearly be shown in your liver’s blood test results.

Make sure to take the supplements daily and at about the same time.

A complementary Fatty Liver Diet Guide

In addition to fatty liver supplements that will help you to cure fatty liver, I highly recommend starting a proper diet plan using the Fatty Liver Diet Guide written by Dorothy Spencer BSN, RN. I cannot express enough of how good this guide is. And the best part is – it’s all natural. It helped many of my patients. Click here for more details.

Liver Enzymes and Exercise

In recent years, there are many indications that liver enzymes levels in the blood and exercise have some kind of association.

For example, taking a blood test close to the time you exercised, could result elevated levels of liver enzymes in the results.

The act of exercising has an affect on the level of liver enzymes, and when taking a blood test timed closely with the exercise, it could result with misleading outcome.

The physician will probably think the blood test results is because of viral infection, which is not true.

However, there is an easy workaround to this situation.

Before taking any blood test, make sure you haven’t exercised beforehand.

It will prevent any unnecessary conclusions regarding your conditions.

It is recommended to wait for about 3 hours after the initial exercise before going through a blood test; this will prevent any mistakes in the blood test related to liver enzymes and exercise.

Fatty Liver and Weight Loss

Weight loss is a crucial part in fatty liver treatment. Losing body weight helped many patients to reverse a non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH / NAFLD) fatty liver disease.

Why weight loss is important in Fatty Liver

The answer to this question is that when a body has excessive amounts of fat, the liver needs to work harder.

And the more the liver needs to work harder, there is an increased chance of inflammation of the liver, that in many cases leads to a fatty liver.

The fatty tissues around the liver cause it to work less efficiently, and some of its daily routine is damaged.

When this happens, it releases excessive liver enzymes, such as ALT or AST (more details about liver enzymes can be found in the liver function blood tests article).

Therefor, the more fat you lose following a weight loss, your liver will simply work better, and will release decreased amounts of ALT, and hopefully normal amount of the enzyme will flow into your blood stream.

In addition, if you’re serious about weight loss, there is one more method that worked for most of my own patients with fatty liver. I highly recommend using the Fatty Liver Diet Guide written by Dorothy Spencer BSN, RN. It’s an alternative and proven method to cure a fatty liver by natural means. Click here to learn more.

Fatty Liver Blood Test

The liver creates various chemicals that are carried out to the bloodstream. Therefor, a blood test is playing a key part in diagnosing many liver disorders and diseases, including a Fatty Liver.

Elevated levels of these chemicals may show a damage to the liver or a specific liver disease. A blood test can measure their levels, and we can try to find the problem even before its symptoms start to show up.

This liver functions blood tests requires to fast for at least 6 hours before the test. Some drugs can affect the results, so please consult with your physician about any drug you use regularly.

Fatty Liver blood test usually includes the following checks

ALT (also called SGPT / Alanine Transaminase)

This is an enzyme that assists proteins to process. High level of ALT may suggest a liver injury. The normal levels of ALT is around 5-40 units per liter (range can vary in different labs).
Fatty Liver blood test

AST (also called SGOT)

An enzyme that is located mainly in liver cells. Its levels are usually raised when there is a liver damage or injury (just like ALT). The normal levels of AST are between 5-45, which is very similar to the ALT enzyme.

ALP (Alkaline Phosphatase)

Related to the biliary tract. If ALP is raised, and high levels of alkaline phosphatase has been found in the bloodstream, the cause might be a liver disorder (including a fatty liver). Normal rates of ALP are between 44-147 units per liter.

GGT (Gamma-Glutamyl Transpeptidase)

An enzyme that is mostly found in the liver, kidneys, heart, and other important organs. The normal rates of GGT are between 40 to 78 units per liter. It’s very similar to ALP (Alkaline Phosphatase), so in that respect, raised GGT can be a symptom of a liver disorder. The difference is that elevated ALP can be also be because of a bone disease, but GGT can’t.

Albumin

This is the core protein created by the liver, that passes into the bloodstream. The ability to make albumin (and many other proteins) is influenced in various liver disorders, including a fatty liver. Normal levels of albumin are between 3.4 to 5.4 deciliter.

Bilirubin

This chemical is a direct result of hemoglobin when it’s released – the molecule that ties oxygen into the red blood cells. The causes of higher bilirubin could be a liver disorder. High level of bilirubin also makes you jaundiced (yellow colored), and could affect your skin and eye color. In the bilirubin blood test, there are 3 types of bilirubin:

  • Direct Bilirubin (unconjugated bilirubin) – passes through the liver. Normal levels of direct bilirubin are between 0 to 0.3 deciliter.
  • Indirect Bilirubin (conjugated bilirubin) – doesn’t pass through the liver. Normal levels of Indirect bilirubin are between 0 to 0.3 deciliter.
  • Total Bilirubin – this is the total amount of direct + indirect bilirubin. Normal levels of total bilirubin are between 0.3 to 1.9 deciliter.

A/G Ratio

The ratio of albumin to globulin. Some liver disorders could lead to a low total protein levels. Normal levels of A/G are below 1 deciliter.

High ALT levels in fatty liver and Elevated ALT levels

An elevated ALT levels in your blood test results could be a sign of a related disorders and diseases, such as Fatty Liver disease, Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C, Cirrhosis, and others.

ALT is a commonly required blood test requested by many physicians from their patients. It’s used to confirm or rule out liver disorders, simply because the enzyme is mostly concentrated in the liver, which is why a higher levels of the enzyme may suggest a problem in the liver.

What are the normal ALT enzyme levels?

Elevated ALT LevelsThe normal level of ALT in the bloodstream is 5 to 45 U/L (units per liter). This range can slightly vary depending where you take the blood test.

When a blood test shows elevated ALT levels outside the normal range, even a small amount, fatty liver and other liver disorders might be the cause.

If the cause of the ALT enzyme level increase is due to a severe liver disease (like Cirrhosis), the levels would be higher than what’s found in fatty livers patients.

Please note that some labs name ALT as “Alanine Transaminase”, “Alanine Aminotransferase” or “SGPT”.

What should I do if I have an Elevated ALT levels?

After you got your results, the first thing you need to do it to consult your physician, the one who requested from you to take the test. He can check the results and choose the next course of action.

In most cases, a follow-up blood test is required to confirm that the first results are not a one-time mishap.

If it is confirmed in the second blood test, you are most likely be required to do an abdominal ultrasound scan. The ultrasound is a necessary tool to look at the liver tissue and to confirm the existence of fatty liver and its severity.

How can I lower my ALT levels?

The most important thing to remember is that most liver diseases such as fatty liver, are very treatable. Fatty liver is also the most common cause of an elevated ALT level.

The main course of treatment is through a determined and decisive actions to heal your liver. It will include weight loss if you’re overweight, change in your food habits, exercise, and more.

Stop eating fat-concentrated foods, and start eating healthy. Use foods for fatty liver recommendations to learn more about what you should and shouldn’t eat. For full details please read thoroughly about fatty liver treatment.

Persistence and a real change in your life-style are the keys to lower your ALT levels.

High alt levels fatty liver

You might need some guidance

This a thought and a big change that isn’t so easy to carry out. It will need your full attention. Your health should be the #1 priority. If you need any guidance, I high recommend the fatty liver diet guide written by Dorothy Spencer BSN, RN, that has been a proven liver diet program that works. It helped a lot of my own patients. Click here to learn more about it.